Open Clusters NGC 1528 and NGC 1545

NGC 1545, NGC 1528, NGC 1491
NGC 1545, NGC 1528, NGC 1491: Section of DSS2. Here could be your picture. [147]

History

The open clusters NGC 1528 (VII 61) and NGC 1545 (VIII 85) were discovered on 28 December 1790 by William Herschel using his 18.7-inch reflecting telescope. For VII 61 he noted: «A beautiful cluster of large stars, very rich, and considerably compressed, about 15' diameter.» For VIII 85 he noted: «A coarsely scattered cluster of large stars, pretty rich.» [465]

Physical Properties

Revised+Historic NGC/IC Version 22/9, © 2022 Dr. Wolfgang Steinicke [277]
Name RA Dec Type bMag vMag B-V SB Dim PA z D(z) MD Dreyer Description Identification, Remarks
NGC 1528 04 15 19.0 +51 12 42 OCL (II2m) 6.4 18 0.776 Cl, B, vRi, cC WH VII 61; GC 820; OCL 397
NGC 1545 04 20 56.2 +50 15 19 OCL (II2p) 6.2 12 0.711 Cl, pRi, lC, st L WH VIII 85; GC 831; OCL 399

Finder Chart

The open clusters NGC 1528 and NGC 1545 are located in the constellation Perseus. The Little Pacman Nebula NGC 1491 is about 2° towards west of NGC 1528. The best observation time is August to March, when they are highest at night. At about 27 November they are in opposition to the Sun and cross the meridian at local midnight.

Finder Chart Open Clusters NGC 1528 and NGC 1545
Open Clusters NGC 1528 and NGC 1545 in constellation Perseus. Charts created using SkySafari 6 Pro and STScI Digitized Sky Survey. Limiting magnitudes: Constellation chart ~6.5 mag, DSS2 close-ups ~20 mag. [149, 160]

Objects Within a Radius of 15°

References