Globular Cluster Messier 10

Messier 10
Messier 10: Image taken by Hubble Space Telescope [215]

History

The globular cluster Messier 10 was discovered by Charles Messier on May 29, 1764. He wrote: «Nebula without a star, in the belt of the serpent-bearer, next to the 30th star of this constellation, sixth magnitude after Flamsteed. This nebula is beautiful and round; it was difficult to see with an ordinary telescope of three feet [focal length].» [281]

Physical Properties

M 10 forms an interesting pair with its neighbor M 12. According to distance estimates, M 10, at 16'000 to 22'000 light years, is closer than the large globular cluster M 13 in the constellation Hercules. The integrated spectral type of M 10 is given as G0. The radial speed of approx. 72 km/s is relatively low compared to other globular clusters. [4]

«Revised New General Catalogue and Index Catalogue» Dr. Wolfgang Steinicke, 2021 [277]
DesignationNGC 6254
TypeGCL (VII)
Right Ascension16h 57m 08.9s
Declination-04° 05' 56"
Diameter20.00 arcmin
Visual magnitude6.6 mag
Dreyer Description! globular, B, vL, R, gvmbM, rrr, st 10…15
IdentificationM 10, GCL 49

Finder Chart

The globular cluster Messier 10 is located in the constellation Serpent Bearer (Ophiuchus) near the 4.82 mag star 30 Ophiuchi. It can best be observed in the months of May to July.

Chart Messier 10
Chart created using SkySafari 6 Pro and STScI Digitized Sky Survey. [149, 160]

References

4«Burnham's Celestial Handbook: An Observer's Guide to the Universe Beyond the Solar System» by Robert Burnham; Dover Publications, Inc.; Voume I: ISBN 0-486-23567-X; Volume II: ISBN 0-486-23568-8; Volume III: ISBN 0-486-23673-0
149SkySafari 6 Pro, Simulation Curriculum; skysafariastronomy.com
160The STScI Digitized Sky Survey; archive.stsci.edu/cgi-bin/dss_form
215Explore - The Night Sky | Hubble’s Messier Catalog; nasa.gov/content/goddard/hubble-s-messier-catalog (2020-12-31)
277«Historische Deep-Sky Kataloge» von Dr. Wolfgang Steinicke; klima-luft.de/steinicke (2021-02-17)
281«Catalogue Nébuleuses et des Amas D'Étoiles» Observées à Paris, par M. Messier, à l'Observatoire de la Marine, hôtel de Clugni, rue des Mathurins. «Connoissance des temps ou connoissance des mouvements célestes, pour l'année bissextile 1784 » Page 227; gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/bpt6k6514280n/f235 (2021-02-21)